AN ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEW

CONVERSATIONS WITH AUNTIE CAROL

A Series of Hawaiian Oral History Interviews
Researched, Conducted, Compiled & Narrated by
Jeanne Burrows-Johnson

Caroline Kuliaikanu`ukapu Wilcox DeLima Farias
Meet Caroline Kuliaikanu`ukapu Wilcox DeLima Farias

It seems as though I have been absent more than present on the Internet this year. . .

WHAT HAVE I BEEN DOING?

I’ve redesigned my websites: JeanneBurrows-Johnson.com [with more Island recipes plus tales about historic Tucson] and ImaginingsWordpower.com [a branding and development website] which will soon have new material.

~  Yen for Murder [the fourth book in the award-winning Natalie Seachrist Hawaiian Mysteries] has been edited and awaits a new publishing home…Perhaps you know a publisher who likes hardcover as well as softcover books—the only type of book libraries concerned with their collection’s longevity will buy. Maybe you even know of a publisher with connections to overseas markets and television and movie opportunities.

I created a professional Facebook page was created to provide updates and links to my websites and this blog.

I’ve just complete writing a detailed introduction with discoursive endnotes for Conversations with Auntie Carol.

AUNTIE CAROL

This last project is especially dear to me. The seven interviews are observations on childhood, family, and events that reflect the inner spirit of Caroline Kuliaikanu`ukapu Wilcox DeLima Farias who lived from 1923 to 2001. Carol was a descendant of ali`i, Hawaiian nobility. Her personal story includes performing hula awana at the Moana Hotel on the beach at Waikīkī on December 6, 1941, the day before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and other parts of O`ahu that brought the United States into the Second World War. 

As a reader or listener will observe, Carol was close to her family and proud of the prominent roles they played in the history of Hawai`i. She was the grandniece of Col. Robert W. K. Wilcox, a major politician and a revolutionary who strove to restore Queen Lili`uokalani to the throne of a sovereign Kingdom of Hawai`i. Carol was also the second cousin of Johanna N. Wilcox, the first woman registered to vote in the U.S. Territory of Hawai`i.

Carol was one of the first people to welcome me to Honolulu in January of 1973. While performing at a Daughters of the British Empire tea to celebrate the birthday of Scottish poet Robert Burns, Carol and others expressed interest in having their daughters study Scottish Highland Dancing with me. Soon I was privileged to teach Carol’s younger daughter Lorna and her neighbor in the Farias home. In 1975, Carol and her family helped plan my wedding and I was especially honored when she performed hula at our reception. Within a couple of years, Lorna was participating in competition and performances, including Highland Games and the Hilo International Festival on the island of Hawai`i. Although Lorna stopped taking dance classes as a teenager, I periodically saw Carol at gatherings in both of our homes.

In 1981, I returned to college. After obtaining a Bachelor of Arts degree in history, I continued studies in Asian and American history and worked as a graduate teaching assistant in the World Civilization program of the University of Hawai`i. As I learned more about Hawaiian history, I was able to appreciate many aspects of Carol’s stories. We remained in touch when I accompanied my husband to Newport, Rhode Island, where he was an instructor at the U.S. Naval Education and Training Center. At that time I began my career as a free-lance writer and marketing consultant.

When I returned to Hawai`i, Carol shared the many changes that had occurred in her life. Three of the sisters of Johanna Wilcox had moved into Carol’s home in Kāne`ohe. This was a time of mixed joys and sorrows for the family. For although her Aunties rejoiced in being united in Carol’s home, by 1990 the last of them had passed, as well as Carol’s beloved husband Freddy. Although I had met a couple of the women, I had absorbed neither their familial dynamics, nor the details of their individual lives. Continue reading AN ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEW

AUDIO BOOKS 1

Prospect for Murder...in written and audio editions...the first Natalie Seachrist Hawaiian Mystery

Prospect for Murder is the first award-winning
Natalie Seachrist Hawaiian Mystery 
written and narrated by
Jeanne Burrows-Johnson

As I have shared recently, I have completed reshaping my author website and ImaginingsWordpower.com [a branding and development tips]. Unfortunately, the new website template system does not allow embedding  audio files directly from my desktop. Therefore, I am placing audio samples in appropriate blogs and inserting hyperlinks on my websites to connect readers to these blogs. Text from the lighthearted article, “Tucson and Her Cemeteries” is available on my author website.  A link to my previous blog provides an audio player for your listening pleasure…

Having completed several audio projects, I’m contemplating publishing an Online compendium of suggestions for your own endeavors in this area of authorship and performance. This would include ideas for project conceptualization, as well as treatments of technical issues…with the proviso that electronic hardware and software are constantly changing.

Today I offer some background on the development of Under Sonoran Skies, Prose and Poetry from the High Desert, which you can read about on my author website.  The six-author anthology was one of the top 50 picks of 2012 by Southwest Books of the Year.

Under Sonoran Skies Prose and Poetry of the High Desert

HARMONY

I believe an invaluable issue in compiling any anthology is establishing harmony among the authors’ personalities, skill sets, and voices. Fortunately, the co-authors of USS had become acquainted in attendance of writers’ salons for a couple of years. 

MY CO-AUTHORS

~  Bill Black, a magician, poet, prosaist, storyteller and MC, who has published numerous books and has been featured in regional and international magazines.  His current works may be found at his author page on Amazon.com

~  Susan Cosby-Patton, retired language arts instructor and poet who is published regionally and nationally. 

~  Kay Lesh, PhD,  educator and psychotherapist who authors professional articles and books and will soon be publishing a collection of short mysteries as well as a memoir. 

The late Reverend Patricia Noble, an author, educator, and speaker who aired radio essays and published journal articles. 

The late Larry Sakin, a political writer, radio talk show host, and green energy entrepreneur active in civic and literacy projects.

OUR COMPLEMENTARY WORK

Over time, we became familiar with the depth of our fiction and non-fiction work and recognized our complimentary voices. This led to a book of eleven themed chapters of poems, short stories, historical articles, and reflective essays.  Our intention was to allow readers to work their way through the book sequentially, or select from varied  subjects. 

The topics of our assembled pieces include: animal companions; business; the environment; history, mythology, personal relationships; phases of life; philosophy; politics; and, war. As most anthologies address a single theme, you may be wondering how we knitted the book together. We began by grouping our disparate works by topic and then placing them in chapters. Imagine our delight when Patricia recognized the synchronicity of flipping the words in the titles of our first and last chapters, “Visioning the Craft” and “Crafting the Vision.”

INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENTS

Production work was apportioned based on experience and interest. Because Kay possesses a well-modulated voice, we asked her to record the front piece material and chapter headings. Susan had been involved with the fabrication of other publications. Therefore, she undertook text layout to meet the requirements of hardcopy and Online production.  We also benefited from the breadth of Bill’s technical knowledge and Patricia’s grammar checking.

While Larry obtained most of the art images in the book, I addressed the overall design. This included utilizing a sunset image shot from my back lānai for the cover, and folio art to frame pagination. Because of my work in historical projects, I also undertook preparing a comprehensive index. 

THE AUDIO EDITION

As the majority of our group had performance experience, we immediately decided to produce an audio, as well as a written edition. We were fortunate that Larry had been working with Jim Waters of Tucson Waterworks Recording for several years. With confidence in both the man’s technical and directing talents, it was easy for each of us to enter the studio for one or more recording sessions. Once Jim had the raw material, he was able to smooth out differences in speed, cadence, and tone.  His final work was to prepare our audio files in several formats.

IN SUMMATION…for now

Was our work perfect?  I don’t believe so, but I hope we have met our listeners’ expectations of a work addressing multiple subjects in truly varied voices.  You will be the judge of the strengths and weaknesses of the few areas of consideration I’ve raised in this brief project overview. 

I think my greatest advice to you is to consider the individual gifts of everyone involved in such a project. This means being aware of yourself, as well as those with whom you are working. A well-produced audio book generates income.  It is also a wonderful way of enhancing recognition of your brand and introducing your work to a greater audience!

Please be aware that the voices you’ll hear in USS vary. And I’ll admit  that not all of us would be appropriate to undertaking the reading of an entire book. Finally, none of us would suggest publishing a work in any form without the input of other established authors, let alone a professional editor and perhaps a performance coach….

Now without further ado, here are a few audio samples from Under Sonoran Skies, Prose and Poetry from the High Desert. I hope you’ll enjoy these selections and understand why it’s my pleasure to continue working with these talented authors.

The Bourbon Eulogy by Bill Black
Prologue to Prospect for Murder by Jeanne Burrows-Johnson
As a Jewel in the Crown by Susan Cosby-Patton
Cookie Time by Kay Lesh

I hope you’ve enjoyed this brief introduction to one of my favorite projects!  Now I think it’s time to turn to the matter of a business Facebook page…

Wishing you the best in your creative journey, 
Jeanne Burrows-Johnson
author, narrator, consultant, and motivational speaker

You may also wish to check out the following blogs on related topics:
~ Quality Book Production, Feb. 15, 2016
~ The Value of an Index, Aug. 28, 2015

To learn more about current and planned projects, please visit my author website at JeanneBurrows-Johnson.com.

Tips on branding, marketing and developing your work are available at Imaginingswordpower.com.

WEBSITE RENEWAL

Jeanne Burrows-Johnson  IT’S BEEN SO LONG!

I can’t believe that half of 2019 has passed! A lot of my work time was lost in experiencing two bouts of flu. The one thing I truly missed has been remaining in touch with those of you who periodically drop in at one of my sites or Facebook. But when I look at the following list, it appears my working in spurts did allow me to accomplish most of my other goals:

Murders of Conveyance, the third Natalie Seachrist Hawaiian Mystery, recently launched.  I hope you have enjoyed at least one of Natalie’s adventures in murder. This book is a romp across the island of O`ahu during a Chinese New Year scavenger hunt. Unfortunately, Natalie discovered that her dream of a film noire was actually another of her visions. It was a mid-twentieth century murder, that eerily parallels the crime that occurs in front of the hotel suite where she and PI Keoni Hewitt are staying. To learn more about this and the rest of the series, drop in at JeanneBurrows-Johnson.com.

~  Some of my down days included study in order to enhance aspects of the never-ending joys of Search Engine Optimization. This resulted in my adding art to my blogs…present and past. [Scanning the left side menu of past blogs may reveal topics worth exploring.]

~  I’ve also reshaped ImaginingsWordpower.com, a website with tips for branding, marketing, and development. While brightening its overall appearance, I decided to move articles I’ve written on historic Tucson to my author’s website. At this time, you’ll find the first third of “An Early History of Tucson and Her Cemeteries.

~  Inspired by the upcoming British Isle holiday of my fabulous editor, Viki Gillespie, I have just completed Yen for Murder, the fourth Natalie Seachrist Hawaiian Mystery. While finishing the remodel of her Auntie Carrie’s cottage, Natalie and Keoni contemplate an antique auction’s catalogue. In it, they discover the image of a Shākyamuni Buddha statue stolen during the commitment of a murder in one of his last cases as a detective with the Honolulu Police Department.

Today I’ve completed the redesign my author website, JeanneBurrows-Johnson.com, which will launch later tonight. There you’ll find the first section of “The Growth of Tucson and her Cemeteries.”  I’m also inserting the following audio sample, “Yuletide in Tucson,” a lighthearted piece on historic Tucson. Wish me luck in embedding this for what I hope will be your listening pleasure!

Yuletide in Tucson

I guess that’s a fair amount of work, but I promise to remain in closer touch with you! This includes launching a business Facebook page.

Wishing you the best in your creative journey,
Jeanne Burrows-Johnson,
author, narrator, consultant, motivational speaker

To learn more about current and planned projects, please visit my author website at JeanneBurrows-Johnson.com.

Tips on branding, marketing and developing your work are available at
Imaginings Wordpower and Design Consultation.